The Super Bowl in Atlanta and Instant Replay Adjustments

Yes, Super Bowl LIII will take place in Atlanta, GA.  Read more about it over at Atlanta Falcons news.  South Florida and Los Angeles, CA will be seeing the championship game as well.

The momentum of football game-play is quite stop-and-go without the commercial interludes.  Add instant replay on account of a coach’s challenge or under other circumstances, and one could probably knit a sweater by the time the two minute warning in the fourth quarter rolls around…probably.  The NFL made some adjustments to how instant replays will assist in officiating the game.  Read all about it here.

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The Last Homecoming

The driver was twelve minutes early just like my assistant had predicted. I stood on the balcony that overlooked the driveway and tried to tie the blue tie my assistant had laid out for me to wear. Every year it gets harder to do the simplest things like tying a tie, knotting shoelaces, cutting steak, and even writing. My assistant can tell my condition has worsened even though I haven’t mentioned a decline in dexterity. She’s neither a doctor nor a rehabilitation specialist, yet, she knows my fingers have to fight much harder to do the things that most people can do without thinking, that I used to do without thinking.

I didn’t want any more people knowing about my struggles.  I didn’t want to have to do any more explaining.  I wasn’t ashamed or afraid of my body’s deterioration; I was just so tired.  I was tired of the knee-jerk concerned reactions.  The faces of sympathetic but unempathetic intentions was wearing me out and I didn’t want to keep up a polite air.

As I contemplated giving up on the tie, I heard my assistant knock on the door.  I turned, waved her in, and held up the tie as she entered.

“You need some help with that?” she asked.

“Apparently so.”

She took the tie and in just a few swift motions, the blue was around my neck.  It hung proudly against the pale blue of my shirt.

“How many more homecomings do I have to go to?”

My assistant stepped back.  “You’re booked for the next five years.”

I retrieved my suit jacket from the chair by the balcony, slipped it on and patted the pockets for my wallet, keys, and phone.

“You don’t look too thrilled.”

And I wasn’t.  It had been twenty years since I’d graduated from high school. Captain of the football team, co-editor of the school newspaper, honor roll student, homecoming king, and president of the debate team.  I did what I needed so I could leave and not come back again.  I wasn’t counting on playing football in college or in the NFL.  I wanted to own a newspaper and publish stories that would change the way people thought and lived.  Who knew the internet would push me into a career in pushing people to the ground?

“You’re the best thing that came out of that town and nobody will let you forget it,” my assistant reminded me. “Now, shall we go?”

I followed her out of the room, down the hall and outside to the awaiting car.  The driver stepped out to greet us.  He shook my hand and opened the back doors before returning to the driver’s seat.

My assistant plowed through emails, texts and put her phone on silent.

“I’m here for you tonight,” she said.  “The rest of the world can wait until tomorrow.”

“My school may expect me to turn up every year for homecoming, but are you sure you aren’t assuring them I will be there just so you can ignore everyone else for one night?”

My assistant remained quiet until we arrived at the school twenty minutes later.  After paying the driver in cash and checking my tie, she patted me on my right forearm.

“You have realistic demands even if I have to convince you to see them through.  Everyone else expects total obedience in exchange for my sanity.  Wouldn’t you stick with you too?”

I couldn’t argue with her reasoning.

~!~

The above scenario came to me as I was drinking a latte and eating gluten-free banana nut bread.
giantcoffeecup

Deep into the Groove

Their bodies spin, slice, crumple, and roll like dice.  Their limbs go rigid then fluid again in under a blink of the eye.  No mandatory balls to catch, no pucks to pass, no bases to steal, just bodies in motion bending and rippling like water waves.  

I’m not referring to football players, hockey players, baseball players or any of those ball players.  I’m talking about dancers.  I am utterly transfixed by the Kinjaz.  Last night, I saw Wong Fu’s “Kpop” video and making-of.  A few of the members of the dance crew Kinjaz were featured in it.  Of course, I looked them up on YouTube and spent the next three hours watching their dances.

Just watch.

My favorite dancers from the group are:

Jawn Ha

Pat Cruz

Vinh Ngyuen

I’ve watched plenty of dance crew vids on YT and sometimes they start looking the same, especially when they’re from the same crew, but so far Kinjaz has proved choreographic consistency without being self-derivative.

 

 

Sporting Stars

Athletes as matinee idols, activists, luxury brands and marketing gurus of the highest order.  They are compelled to excel on borrowed time for every competition they live through, every game they win (or lose), their bodies are depleted a little bit more, and their wattage diminishes.  Athletes are not rechargeable batteries; their hinges, pistons, and rods have expiration dates, breaking points that science and technology desperately wishes to address.  At what cost, though?  For whose glory? While bones can be set, muscles rested, and skin stitched up, cerebral integrity does not so easily recuperate.

CBC

Professional athletes are commodities, spokespersons for a capitalist cause and fodder for sliding scale spectacle: faster, higher, longer, louder, technical skill and artistic merit meld into supernovas of aerodynamics and body trauma.  Their lustre lasts for a finite period of measurable time, but their legacy shines (and sometimes darkens) ever after.

Perhaps, the same could be said about construction workers, home improvement painters, combat soldiers, law enforcement personnel, firefighters, tree removal specialists, stunt performers, and thespians.  Occupations that require one to exert physical strength, perform repetitive actions, test the limits of the human body as both a biological contraption and a mechanical apparatus (reusable and adaptable) define the notion of borrowed time.  Except for the issue of immediate death and its probability of happening on the job, a professional athlete and a front-line soldier inhabit the same existential realm.  Their objectives and environments may differ, but their goals are unequivocal: outscore the opponent and stay uninjured.  An NFL player has the luxury, of course, of not having to contend with the psychological ramifications of being killed during a game, but injury is still possible.

In their brightest manifestation, at their most financially lucrative, athletes win hearts, sponsorship deals, and are regarded as perfect in every way — as if daring Mary Poppins to emerge and set the record straight that there is only one who is practically perfect in every particular.  The truth is that stars die and by the time we see them, they are already gone.  The one who jumps higher, the one who dunks a basket like no other, the one who runs faster than the wind itself, these feats of physicality — all on borrowed time.

Appreciate them while they are here; be awe-inspired by what they can do with their bodies.  What performs like the nectar of the gods today may have evaporated by tomorrow until there is nothing left to give, to scrape away, to sell, to hate.

Behold them.  Remember them.  One day, they’ll all be gone.

On Elusive Victory: Misapplied Data Models or Overlooked Variables?

 

 

Say not what you think I need to hear,
say not what your investors demand
when they come near the Sunday night lights
swept up in the pomp and circumstance
of TV cameras, confident linemen
and a house filled with brand enthusiasts.

Say not what you think I need to believe,
say not what your supporters soak up
when they wipe the sweat off the brow
of your best quarterback,
so enamored and honored to have been asked.

Say not what everyone has been saying to themselves,
instead, tell us you could bother
to dig and pry loose old fears and older tears.

Find the magic in the snap,
in the complete pass forty yards down the field,
manifested by instinct,
guaranteed with heart —
not algorithms and data charts,
things that might as well
be used for selling luxury cars.

— yiqi 3 may 2016 8:12 pm

The above poem was inspired by the comments on this AJC piece featuring quotes from Arthur Blank and his belief in the success of the Falcons for the 2016 season.

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When I bring up the reason why I haven’t watched any televised football, specifically the Atlanta Falcons, for a few a consecutive years, I am met with a lot of nodding heads and suggestions to watch televised NBA or college football.  And then someone asks, rhetorically or not, why the Falcons can’t make it to and through the playoffs to play in the Super Bowl?  I hadn’t thought about the why of it until recently.  It’s a good question.

How is it that decision-makers, scouts, and other persons responsible for identifying, attracting, and cultivating a winning team haven’t been able to reap the fruit of their recruiting labor?  A businessman who has ostensibly known more success than setbacks shouldn’t have to keep pining for the ultimate fruit of applied data analysis.  Why do some teams get to live a sports inspirational redemption narrative while other teams are stuck in tale of Sisyphus forever rolling a rock up the same hill over and over again?  Why is it that applying data models can effect positive change in pure athletic performance for an individual player but not the whole team or more effectively in baseball than football?

The first question I’d address is if there are overlooked variables that have nothing to do with batting averages, 40 yard dash time, or past performance patterns.  I shan’t pretend to possess a deep knowledge of statistical factors (other than that they exist and inform choices of who is drafted, benched, or cut) or microscopic-level details of the biological machinery that is a well-oiled, well-practiced football team.  I imagine there are aspects that breathe and permeate through the interpersonal dynamics of a competitive sports team that remain unseen and unknown to the outside — even in this day and age of hyper-drive experiential exhibitionism and voyeurism.

Putting together a consistently triumphant team isn’t necessarily the same as a harmonious team.  Just because everyone can play better than all of their college teammates combined, doesn’t mean they will play nice with each other.  I realize that finalizing the roster may result from imperatives beyond the actual game-play (contracts, monetary constraints, leveraging a multitude of components for current and future seasons).  I am also keenly aware that the rules of athletic engagement facilitate and demand their own momentum, energy, and parameters of prospering/failing.

To score points in baseball, a series of actions must take place: the batter must hit the ball such that he and/or his teammates can run the bases back to home plate without the other team getting them out.  In other words, don’t get struck out and successfully run/steal the bases.  Whichever team has the highest number of runs at the end of nine innings is the winner.  To score points in football, a series of actions (outcomes) must happen: the offensive player must carry into or catch the ball in the end zone, kick the ball through the uprights, or both.  Two additional points are awarded if the offense can get the ball into the end zone after a touchdown (rather than kicking for an extra point).  Again, whichever team has the highest number of TDs or field goals at the end of the fourth quarter is the winner.

Taking into account the ways in which each team attempts to prevent the other team from scoring, victory is not as simple as going through the offensive motions, executed brilliantly or not.  In baseball, the pitcher can strike out one or more batters before any of them have a chance to jog to first base.  He can also get a base-stealer out who is one or two steps too slow.  In football, the other team’s defense can intercept the quarterback’s pass, sack him before he has a chance to look up, tackle the running backs, wide receivers, or block a field goal.

Of course, there’s game-play strategy, encompassing the strengths, weaknesses, and idiosyncrasies of one’s own team and those of the opponent.  Once you’ve controlled for performance stats, franchise mythology, self-esteem/motivation issues of individual players or teams as a whole, the game-play itself is left.*  The primary text holds epistemological insights.

Visualize the various baseball players and what they may or may not do over twenty minutes.  It’s reasonable to assert that the pitcher’s attention must be on one to three places at a time: the catcher, the batter/home plate and any other runner trying to steal a base.  Other than the base-stealer(s), his targets are pretty stationary.  The pitcher may have to keep second or third base within instinctual sights, but those runners from the other team are not running at him.  Neither the infielders nor the outfielders have to worry about the other team running at them either.  The batter and any of his teammates who may be waiting to run home just have to hit the ball and run respectively.  Again, nobody must watch out for opposing players going at them (though, some players do collide).  Each player, when on the field of play, has specific parameters in which to excel and to promote the athlete as an individual and part of a whole.  It’s a cumulative team effort via individual success.

Observe:

Now, imagine one possession in a football game.  Moments before the snap, the quarterback looks around to see that his team is in place and the other team is in place.  He knows what play to run and unless he calls an audible, it’s as straight-forward as executing that play.  Except that it isn’t so simple.  He may connect with his wide receiver or running back, but there’s no guarantee the ball-carrier will move the ball ten or more yards no less make it to the end zone.  And why ever not?  Because defensive players from the other team are chasing after and acting as obstacles to the offensive players.  Compared even to a bases loaded scenario in baseball, a single offensive play in football involves many more players in motion simultaneously, converging onto the same space and specific areas of the playing field.

Observe:

Let that juxtaposition sink in for a spell.  In one sport, the sources of “threat” are encapsulated by each player’s function spread out across an expansive field.  The gathering of players doesn’t happen unless the inning is over and the teams switch places (or two players get into each other’s faces and there’s a melee whereupon the dugout may empty onto the field).  In the other sport, the sources of “threat” are flying by you, aiming for you, on your heels, three steps ahead and to the side.  Undoubtedly, it is your job as the wide receiver or running back to anticipate that chaos and run through it just as it is the job of your teammates to block for and protect you.

Yes, NFL players are trained and live for creating order out of that sensory load.   Yes, they have to be able to filter out the visual “white noise” so they can focus on not horse-collaring, false-starting, or holding, all the while putting points on the board or helping their team do it by clearing a path or protecting the QB.  It is precisely because of these intricacies that NFL Films so gorgeously demonstrates what I believe there are other factors that affect how reliably well the players do across a game and across a season: chemistry, physical and cognitive agility, nurturing the capabilities to score well period and to play smarter than the other team can against you.

Observe (I’m not a New England Patriots fan per se, but this video is topically relevant):
Certainly, there are repeatable behaviors and evidence-based information that contributes to how a team and its players evolve and grow to be dependably good and great.  I can’t help but wonder if it’s ultimately more art and serendipity than science and math.  Perhaps applying a winning strategy with a high return on financial, psychological, and emotional investment is more like an organ transplant — the donor and the recipient have to be a match and there’s still a chance of rejection.  What appears to be applicable systemically for great results is an illusion.  A team wins because of specific players in that specific time and place, defying expectations and breaking patterns.

Taking a step back from high-level contemplation and dipping into more grounded concerns, the Falcons have to play better against the other teams in the NFC South.  It’s not a foreign concept nor an unattainable feat for them.  They’ve done it before and in this century.  When Arthur Blank or anyone else in the Falcons organization expresses full faith and determination in a kick-arse season, the reluctance still remains.  How do you know? Doing everything right and smart that a team can do couldn’t equate to a victory on the field because they aren’t the other team.  They may know their opponents like  the back of their hand, but they can’t control what their opponents do or how they react.

Therein lies the beauty and escapist elements of watching a team play their hearts out and take in a good harvest.  That’s zen right there — a win today, maybe, maybe not a win next week.  Zen has its place in helping a player keep cool under times of extreme duress while the weight of a divisional title and playoff chance is pounding him on the shoulders, but try telling that to people who pay for a chance to live vicariously through his endeavors.  They want to see the professional baller outscore the other team, not have a spiritual awakening in the red zone.  Although, that would make for an awesome viral video.

* But can you really control for the strengths and weaknesses of other teams?  Football teams operate like colonies of ants — each ant has a duty and they all work as one fluid unit to ensure the survival of their queen and their home.  At this point, I wouldn’t be surprised if sheer luck and recognizing kindred spirits in each teammate isn’t the actual reason one franchise has an enviable biographical legend and another is a sad, soggy bowl of cereal.  No matter what the bowl looks like, what milk is used, or what combination or permutation of cereal used, it’s forever sad and soggy.

Bonus Round: NFL as Theatre — something sounds like rice krispies.