College Football 2009: Pittsburgh holds on to Notre Dame’s love

Yay! Saturday Night Football on my local ABC station.  It’s been a while, dear lover.

But first.  It’s a great day to be a YELLOW JACKET! ACC, I tell ya.

Back to your regularly scheduled blog entry:

Notre Dame Fighting Irish and the Pittsburgh Panthers entwined spandex tonight at Hines Field.  The first quarter saw the Panthers scoring first with a touchdown connection between quarterback Bill Stull and wide receiver Oderick Turner.  Right? No.  Turner couldn’t maintain possession of the ball after catching it in the back of the end zone.  The Panthers made a field goal instead (Dan Hutchins at kick).  Pittsburgh 3 and Notre Dame 0.  The second quarter started with the Fighting Irish having to punt the ball away.  Panthers defensive back Jared Holley intercepted Jimmy Clausen three minutes into the quarter.  The Irish tie the game with a forty-two yard DavidRuffer field goal.  Pittsburgh 3 and Notre Dame 3.   Let the tie be broken.  With fewer than three minutes left in the first half, Panthers wide receiver Jonathan Baldwin made a leaping TD catch.  Pittsburgh 10 and Notre Dame 3.

The third quarter was molasses on the brain for about four minutes until Jonathan Baldwin made a gorgeous catch.  Long legs, long arms, up in the air.  Delicieuse.  Panthers increased their lead with a field goal and then again minutes later when running back Ray Graham made a TD.  Pittsburgh 20 and Notre 3.  The Fighting Irish suddenly woke up from their lethargy in the bottom of the third quarter when wide receiver Michael Floyd caught a forty-four yard projectile from Jimmy Clausen.  The TV signal became very splotchy and image very pixelated at this point in the telecast.

The Fighting Irish eventually got a TD seconds into the fourth quarter (the ‘ol QB broke the plane but the extra point was no good).  Panthers running back Dion Lewis crumpled up the meaning of that numerical increase by running fifty yards for a TD.  Pittsburgh 27 and Notre Dame 9.  But the Irish weren’t going to implode just yet.  Wide receiver Golden Tate managed to cross the goal line as he was going down to the ground.  Pittsburgh 27 and Notre Dame 16.  WOW! SWEET RED BELL PEPPER HUMMUS!!! GOLDEN TATE and an EIGHTY-SEVEN YARD return for a TD.  The two-point conversion was no good, but dayam.  Highlight of the game, methinks.  What would the Fighting Irish do with just about two minutes left in the game?  Jimmy Clausen was overtaken by Panther-blue on two attempts to throw.  The Fighting Irish did some amazing things in the second half, but uh, it was a snare too little for a win.  Pittsburgh 27 and Notre Dame 22. Final score.

Observations & Miscellania:

1.  Commentary was provided by Kirk Herbstreit and Brent Musburger, who remarked in the top of the quarter that “Golden Tate” is a great name for a Notre Dame player.

2.  High angle shots of the field revealed a hazy, white sheen in the sidelines at the top of the screen .  Was it a musty night?

3.  Did I see a Jerome Bettis jersey when the game returned from commercial break with 4:25 minutes left to play in the first quarter?  Yes, I did.  Bettis went to Notre Dame.

4.  Does it phase the punter or kicker when he’s readying to kick the ball and there he is on the jumbotron with televised movements two seconds slower than his real-time motions? I’m referring to Notre Dame punter Eric Maust in the top of the second quarter.

5.  The Fighting Irish “real life” mascot mimed punching moves and kept repeating “let’s go” to the camera that was taping him before the telecast cut to commercial in the top of the second quarter.

6.  Is it my imagination or is ESPN’s boxscore/game center page refreshing lagging about ten minutes?  Through the first half at least.

7.  Notre Dame’s players have light blue mouth guards.

8.  Panthers defensive back Antwuan Reed plowed into one of the ABC cameramen after following one of the Notre Dame players into the back corner of the end zone.

Click here for game summary, stats, and play-by-play.

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