NFL 2010: Donovan McNabb dazed and Michael Vick chews gum

A week ago the Dallas Cowboys clobbered the Philadelphia Eagles 34 to 0 in the last regular season game.  Tonight, the Cowboys rinsed and repeated the victory, only the Eagles managed to score two touchdowns (courtesy of wide receivers Jeremy Maclin and DeSean Jackson).  It was televised on NBC with commentary by Al Michaels and Cris Collinsworth.  Michaels wore an off-white button-down shirt and a burgundy and rose striped tie.  Collinsworth had on a light bluish-gray button-down shirt and a dark navy and blue-striped tie.  I didn’t watch the game until the bottom of the third quarter, at which time the Eagles only had one TD.  DeSean Jackson’s catch happened in the top of the fourth quarter.  Philadelphia did put up some numbers in this wildcard game, nevertheless, Dallas beat them by twenty points.

Observations and Miscellania:

1. When Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb connected with Jeremy Maclin for twenty-five yards in the bottom of the third quarter, the telecast went with the camera on the Dallas side of the field.  Maclin ran, facing the camera, into their sidelines and stiff-armed safety Ken Hamlin.  When the fourth quarter began, upon returning from a commercial break, the telecast switched to the other side of the field as DeSean Jackson’s touchdown was recorded with him running from screen-right to screen-left.  In filmmaking, if you were to edit a sequence such that Character A is moving from screen-left to screen-right in one shot and then from screen-right to screen-left in the next shot, you’ll confuse the viewer (continuity error).  When something similar occurs in televised football, it just means that the team running with the play is still on offense.

2.  The Who is performing at Super Bowl XLIV!

3.  I love watching people that are in a state of jubilation.  I know it doesn’t apply to everyone, but seeing someone who is sad compels others to turn down the lights, so to speak, to dim the pep.  Even if you don’t get to or decide not to do anything to comfort that someone, your inclination to sympathize and be considerate ostensibly comes naturally.  The sight of other people being happy, though, can more often than not incite envy or disdain.  In contrast, looking at people (usually strangers) experiencing and expressing joy is such a delight for me.  For example, football players in the middle or bottom of the fourth quarter when they know that they’re going to win a wildcard, playoff, or championship game.  A few of the Cowboys were featured in such shots during the second half of tonight’s game.  Defensive linebacker Keith Brooking and wide receiver Miles Austin were filmed in medium close-up as they gazed up.  I later realized that they were probably looking up at the jumbotron suspended from the ceiling.

4.  Regarding the title of this post, there was a close-up of Donovan McNabb and Michael Vick on the sidelines.  Both were looking off-screen right.  McNabb appeared tired and dazed; Vick was chewing gum.  As my eyes moved from the former to the latter, I had barely formed the thought, “I bet Vick’s very grateful for where he is now,” when I suddenly started thinking, “How can Vick be playing football again, how can he have this second chance when something like this takes a person’s life away?”  Or something like this, or this, or this.  Although I use these examples in place of something a breath closer to heart, the comparison is still the same.  Where is the thematic justice?  But it’s not that simple, is it?  It really doesn’t work that way; the unfairness transcends overgeneralizations that bad people outlive good people and that good people are punished for their kindness and bad people aren’t always held accountable for their massively poor judgment.

Michael Vick did a bad thing, and he’s had to atone for behavior.  He still is atoning.  He has to wake up every day reminded of how fortunate he is to have the opportunity to right his wrong philosophically.  In the mean time, someone like the victims in those above links, who’s surely brightened many people’s daytime hours, whom I’ve seen without eye contact or friendly greeting, has to depart so that those who survive can reflect upon–even reassess–their own mortality.  I’ve only known four good people who’ve had their earthbound lives cut short due to unforeseen elements: car accident, airplane accident, and staph infection.  I knew them.  They had known my name and face.  I may only know of this someone here, yet I’m saddened and have thought about the situation longer than I think makes sense.

~!~

Apparently, only one commercial comes on TV in Japan during time-outs in NFL games.  Say hello to Japanese girls in bikinis intercut with NFL gear.

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