My first 3D: Tron Legacy

To cut to the chase, no pun intended, I’ve never had any interest in watching a film in 3D.  I had wanted to watch Tron: Legacy (Joseph Kosinski, 2010) in regular D but got the showtimes mixed up, thus, I had to take the 3D experience.  I ended up viewing the majority of the film without wearing the 3D lenses.  They wouldn’t fit properly on my nose (on top of my existing set of spectacles) and made my left-eye astigmatism more pronounced.  Moreover, I found it much more engaging to make note of what was and was not likely to be in 3D, aka, what was clear sans 3D glasses vs. what was with 3D glasses.  Overall, though I didn’t dislike it, I thought it was missing something, can’t quite put my finger on what, though.
YNort

I liked the soundtrack a lot.  I think I’ll purchase it.

Click here for more images from the film.

4 thoughts on “My first 3D: Tron Legacy

  1. The Mark

    “Overall, though I didn’t dislike it, I thought it was missing something, can’t quite put my finger on what, though.”

    Did you mean the movie or the 3D experience or both?

    Reply
  2. Philippe

    A problem with gimmicks like 3D and special effects is that they draw attention to themselves, and away from the essence of the film itself.

    I’ll go so far as to say that even colour is a gimmick that detracts from the essence of most films.

    I’ve heard it said that most film-makers of substance and discernment (who therefore don’t include James Cameron) would rather make their films in black-and-white than in colour, but don’t do so only because fewer people would pay to see a black-and-white film than one in colour.

    I, for what its worth, would love it if all films were still made in black-and-white, and would love it if photography was still all black-and-white. And I have this, like, feeling that there are many others out there who, like me, would love it if all films and photography were still in black-and-white, but don’t publicly admit to this.

    A love of black-and-white is a love which dare not speak its name.

    Reply
    1. sittingpugs Post author

      I’ve heard it said that most film-makers of substance and discernment (who therefore don’t include James Cameron) would rather make their films in black-and-white than in colour, but don’t do so only because fewer people would pay to see a black-and-white film than one in colour.

      I’ve heard that too….or some variation. Not that non-JC filmmakers would rather make films in BW, rather, they would like the option to make more BW films without having to call it an homage to the past or have the lack of color be explained as a stylistic device.

      Color and BW both have their place in form and function.

      Reply

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