Tag Archives: Troy Aikman

NFL Thanksgiving 08: Cowboys crush-with-eyeliner the Seahawks

The Dallas Cowboys.  The Seattle Seahawks.   The Lone Star State.  Candied Yams Day 2008 part deux.   Televised by Fox, the first quarter began with a touchdown catch by Cowboys tight end Martellus Bennett.   On their next possession, running back Marion Barber got into the end zone.  The Seahawks got on the board with a field goal in the bottom of the quarter.  Dallas 14 and Seattle 3.  The second quarter started with a TD catch by tight end Jason Witten, who was playing with a broken rib.  Dallas 21 and Seattle 3.  The Cowboys increased their lead with a field goal as the clock headed towards the half of the second quarter.  Dallas 24 and Seattle 3.  The Seahawks field goaled again in the bottom of the quarter.  Dallas 24 and Seattle 6.

The third quarter started with a Seattle field goal.  Cowboys 24 and Seahawks 9.   Seattle cornerback Marcus Trufant intercepted an end zone pass from Dallas quarterback Tony Romo that was meant for wide receiver Terrell Owens.  That turnover yielded nothing.  After making an impeccable left-handed twirling catch, Owens made a TD catch in the bottom of the third quarter.  Dallas 31 and Seahawks 9.  The fourth quarter progressed about halfway and the Cowboys landed another field goal.  34 to 9.  Final score.

Observations & Miscellania:

1.  Joe Buck and Troy Aikman were commentators.

2.  Demi Lovato sang the national anthem.   I was eleven years old when she was born.   Kurt Cobain was still alive when she was born.  The camera caught a shot of a helmet-less Tony Romo and Terrell Owens among others.   Demi’s voice is nice and throaty but she sounded a pinch nervous.

3.  Troy Buck and Joe Aikman talked about the Jonas Brothers in the minute or so in the bottom of the second quarter.  Apparently the trio is popular with first-grade girls and middle-aged women.  Two of the brothers look alike enough to be assumed to be related (maybe it’s the eyebrows); the other one does not.  They performed three songs: “Tonight,” “Love Bug,” and “Burnin Up.”  They were quite out of breath by the end of the second song.

4.  Seahawks quarterback Matt Hasselbeck was sacked seven times today.

Get game summary, stats, and play-by-play here.

Super Bowl XLII 2008: Giants Sautee the Patriots!

The New England Patriots and the the New York Giants ascended to the top of their respective AFC and NFC conferences at the close of the 2007 season. Today in Glendale, Arizona at the University of Phoenix Stadium, they touched helmets in a test of ultimate gridiron skill and talent.

Televised on Fox, the forty-second Super Bowl game started with the Giants receiving the kick-off. New York ended their first drive with a field goal. The first quarter ended with only two possessions (a Super Bowl record for fewest number), one per team. The second quarter started with a touchdown by Patriots running back Laurence Maroney. New England 7 and New York 3.

On the Giants’ next drive, their quarterback Eli Manning threw a brilliant thirty-eight-yard pass to wide receiver Amani Toomer at the nineteen yard line. A touchdown didn’t seem too out of reach (despite a five yard penalty for a delay of game). Unfortunately, Giants wide receiver Steve Smith couldn’t keep onto the ball and Patriots cornerback Ellis Hobbs snatched it. Going into halftime, Patriots still 7 and Giants still 3.

The third quarter included a sack of Tom Brady by Michael Strahan at about the seven-minute mark. There was no scoring. Sweet Fancy Moses!! The fourth quarter began with a touchdown by Giants wide receiver David Tyree. It was so pretty and culminated a drive that partly consisted of an awesome forty-five yard pass to tight end Kevin Boss. New York 10 and New England 7. Patriots wide receiver Randy Moss put another TD on the board in the bottom of the fourth quarter. Patriots 14 and Giants 10. And that’s how the game ended. Yes? NO!!!!

With just about forty-five seconds left in the fourth quarter, Giants wide receiver Plaxico Burress made a touchdown. New York 17 and New England 14. And that would be the final score. The subterranean dog has won Super Bowl XLII.

Giants head coach Tom Coughlin must be one of the happiest persons in the world tonight.

Tom Brady will not be the third quarterback to have gone to and won four Super Bowls. The other two are Terry Bradshaw and Joe Montana.

Observations & Miscellania:

1. I didn’t watch the majority of the pre-game montage, vignettes, and Ryan Seacrested “red carpet” banter.

2. Joe Buck and Troy Aikman provided commentary.

3. Tom Brady wasn’t wearing his helmet when he and his Patriots were walking out from the tunnel, but it was on his head by the time they ran on the field.

4. Jordin Sparks sang the National Anthem. Holy Mary in a Manger. Jordin’s father was an NFL player, Phillippi Sparks. She did a pretty good job. She didn’t sound nervous and didn’t try to impress anyone with high notes or long-held notes, nor was her performance underwhelming. Is it my imagination or does the “Star Spangled Banner” seem shorter and shorter every time it’s sung?

5. Mike Carey was the referee today. He’s been officiating in the NFL for eighteen years but hasn’t been to the Super Bowl prior to this one.

6. Nearly halfway through the first quarter, after returning from a commercial break, the camera cut to a glimpse of Peyton Manning in one of the VIP boxes. He looked amazing, very polished, tres beau.

7. After returning from commercial break (featuring a Tide stain remover), the camera caught glimpses of Giselle Bundchen (wearing a black long-sleeve shirt, a greenish (?) scarf, and gold hoop earrings), Jenny McCarthy, Jim Carrey, and Pamela Anderson in various VIP booths. Jenny and Jim were sitting next to each other.

8. Giants linebacker Kawika Mitchell and defensive end Michael Strahan brought down Tom Brady, which was followed by another collective hit by defensive ends Osi Umenyiora and Justin Tuck just past the halfway point in the second quarter.

9. At the very bottom of the second quarter, the camera cut to Robert Kraft, chairman and CEO of the Patriots, sitting in his box. Kurt Russell and Kate Hudson were sitting behind him.

10. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers performed during the halftime show. Hmm. It started off all dark except for a lit guitar-shapped arrow going into a lit heart (on which Tom Petty and his band were performing). They performed “American Girl,” “I Won’t Back Down,” “Free Falling,” and a third song that was mostly instrumental. I was satisfied with this year’s halftime show because I rather like Tom Petty’s music.

11. Bill Belichick, Patriots head coach, was wearing a red hoodie today instead of the usual grey.

12. At the top of the fourth quarter, the camera cut to a shot of LL Cool J at the stadium. Jeremy Shockey, Giants tight end, also received a medium close-up. He broke left leg during a game against the Washington Redskins near the end of the season.

13. Giants rookie defensive tackle Jay Alford sacked Tom Brady with fewer than twenty-five seconds left in the fourth quarter, helping to ensure that the Patriots wouldn’t score again.

14. No offense to any Patriots fans who might be reading this post, but I don’t think I’ve been as happy in months as I was when Plaxico Burress made that TD and Jay Alford sacked Tom Brady in the bottom of the fourth quarter. My mouth hurt from smiling so much.

Memorable commercials for me:

Audi R8 (reference to the first Godfather film)

Diet Pepsi Max (reference to the Chris Kattan and Will Ferrell SNL skit–you won’t get it unless you’ve seen the SNL skit)

Budweiser (featuring Clydesdale horses and a Dalmation dog and incorporating the sports inspirational narrative)

Get game summary, stats, and play by play here.

Be sure to tune in to Fox next Sunday for the 2008 Pro-Bowl game.

NFC Divisional 2008: the Giants pretzel-twist the Cowboys

The Dallas Cowboys and the New York Giants compare lunch boxes at the Texas Stadium in Irving, TX in hopes of advancing to the NFC Championship Game.

Televised on Fox, the first quarter took off with a touchdown by Giants wide receiver Amani Toomer.  In the top of the second quarter, Cowboys wide receiver Terrell Owens tied the game with a TD.  New York challenged it but the call stood. The second quarter ticked down to about a minute and Cowboys running back Marion Barber was awarded with a TD, which was then reviewed and stood.  After “twenty plays, ninety yards, and ten minutes and twenty-eight seconds of game-play,” as Joe Buck remarked, the Cowboys took the lead 14 to 7 going into halftime.  RIght? Wrong Amani Toomer made a TD catch with fewer than thirty seconds on the game clock.  Giants running back Brandon Jacobs and Cowboys strong safety Roy Williams had a scuffle after that play.    Both teams went into halftime tied 14 to 14.

The third quarter began with a field goal by the Cowboys, tie broken. 17 to 14.  The fourth quarter started with a touchdown by Brandon Jacobs; Giants in the lead with 21 points.  Several attempts by the Cowboys were ultimately futile as cornerback R.W. McQuarters intercepted the last pass by Tony Romo in the fourth quarter.  Final score: New York 21 and Dallas 17.

I’m sad.  I suppose I’m going to lend my support to the Green Bay Packers next week in the NFC Championship game.

Observations & Miscellania:

1. Joe Buck and Troy Aikman provided commentary for this game.  I do believe Buck looks better in moving pictures than in still ones.

2. It’s not my imagination.  The music transition to and from commercial on these Fox NFL telecasts is a clone of the “Sleigh Ride” holiday song.  Specifically, the part that goes “giddy yap, giddy yap, giddy yap/ let’s go,/let’s look at the show/we’re riding in a wonderland of snow/giddy yap, giddy yap, giddy yap/it’s grand, just holding your hand/we’re gliding along with the song/of a wintry fairy land.”

3. Giants wide receiver Plaxico Burress has endured a torn ligament for most of the season, if I remember the commentators correctly.

4. There were two slow-motion instant replays concerning the Jacobs-Williams row.  The row itself (Jacobs tackled Willams and they essentially got caught up in a quasi-wrestling-tumbling maneuver; tthey stood up and started shoving) and Giants head coach Tom Coughlin mouthing something mostly along the lines of “that was a fuhcking face mask!”

5. Giants quarterback Eli Manning is twenty-six days older than I am.

6. After Brandon Jacobs made the TD in the top of the fourth quarter, he slammed the ball into the play clock, creating a metallic thwack sound.

7. By the end of the game, Dallas received eleven penalties.  New York three.

Get game summary, stats, and play by play here.

It’s all about the Benjamins: Sports and Big Kahunas

Not surprised with the names mentioned below, are you?

The Sports Billionaires

By Klaus Kneale, Forbes.com
December 4, 2007

Owning a sports team can be a frustrating proposition. Expensive players get in trouble off the field. Coaches’ egos need constant soothing. And fans are fleeting – especially if their team loses as ticket prices rise.

But for some billionaires, the allure of the victory – and the chance their team will soar in value – makes all the player misbehavior, years of rebuilding and negative press worth it.

Take Robert Kraft, the owner of the National Football League’s darling New England Patriots. When Kraft bought the team in 1994 for a then-record $172 million, the team was a faltering money-loser, winning less than half its games since 1959, the year it started. Kraft transformed them into one of the most valuable sports franchises in the world, these days worth $1.2 billion.

On the arm of star quarterback Tom Brady, the Pats won three Super Bowls and have the best record in the league this season. The success of the team made Kraft a billionaire. The majority of his $1.4 billion fortune is wrapped up in the Patriots; the remainder comes from real estate and other investments, as well as the New England Revolution Major League Soccer team.

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones struck it rich in natural gas in the 1970s. He bought the then-junky Cowboys for $158 million in 1989. Led by quarterback Troy Aikman and running back Emmitt Smith, the team won three Super Bowls in the 1990s. Today they’re worth $1.5 billion before debt and sit atop the National Football Conference East, led by star quarterback Tony Romo.

Nearly all of Jones’ $1.5 billion net worth is derived from the Cowboys; he recently sold $300 million worth of his personal real estate to help pay for the current construction of a new $1 billion Cowboys Stadium.

Vanity investors dominate Europe, buying soccer teams to own soccer teams, but making their fortunes elsewhere. Iceland’s Bjorgolfur Gudmundsson made his $1.2 billion fortune in shipping, banking, real estate and beer brewing before buying soccer’s West Ham United last November. Silvio Berlusconi, Italy’s richest man, built his $11.8 billion fortune through media investment; he became president of soccer’s legendary squad A.C. Milan in 1986.

But the king of them all has to be Roman Abramovich, the 41-year-old Russian oil guru who spent a tiny fraction of his $18.7 billion net worth to scoop up debt-heavy U.K. soccer giant Chelsea in 2003. Once reviled for his moves, he grew on fans after immediately spending more than $170 million on new players. The squad’s 2004-2005 season is considered its most successful season ever, and the team’s value is up 58 percent since Abramovich bought the team – despite not winning a championship or building a new stadium.

 

Read the rest of the article here.  See pictures of these suits-and-ties here.